The Fremantle Press Podcast

Perhaps you're a lover of literature or just love book chat of any kind; perhaps you're an aspiring ... more

Hosted by

Latest Episodes

June 03, 2022 00:28:19
Helen Milroy presents: Kathryn Lefroy on how ‘vomit drafting’ before learning how to write can be useful

Helen Milroy presents: Kathryn Lefroy on how ‘vomit drafting’ before learning how to write can be useful

Growing up, Kathryn Lefroy was not allowed to watch television, and was instead encouraged to create stories for herself and read books. Kathryn gave up writing for fun when academia and university studies took her away from her path. So when she did circle back to it, Kathryn said she made a conscious decision not to learn how to write. Instead she says she ‘vomit drafted’ her first manuscript. She got it onto the page before she went back to learning her craft and the skills she needed to be a storyteller. From there, Kathryn says she got many rejections before publication, ‘I’ve been rejected hundreds of times. Hundreds and hundreds of times. I’ve had people say to me “you’re really not as good as you think you are”. I’ve had people say to me “don’t give up your day job” and I’m like, this is my day job, that’s awkward. I’ve had people say all kinds of things and I just keep coming back to the fact that creative industries are so subjective. So if you get one bad piece of feedback that does not mean you should give up, that means, if anything, you should work harder to prove that person wrong.’ Topics covered: Instilling hope in your writingNever giving upNot comparing yourself to othersResilience and persistence Books mentioned The Wolves of Willoughby Chase by Joan Aiken About the host: Dr Helen Milroy is a descendant of the Palyku people of the Pilbara region of Western Australia. She was born and educated in Perth and has a passionate interest in health and wellbeing, especially for children. She is currently a professor at the University of Western Australia, a consultant child and adolescent psychiatrist, and ...

Listen

April 29, 2022 00:30:00
Helen Milroy presents: Aśka explains the difference between an illustrator and a visual storyteller

Helen Milroy presents: Aśka explains the difference between an illustrator and a visual storyteller

The amazing Helen Milroy returns to the podcast chair for her first interview of 2022. Helen chats to the co-creator of Stars in Their Eyes, Aśka. You’ll love hearing about Aśka’s journey from high flying physicist to high flying visual storyteller – what a leap of faith! She chats about her unique collaboration with Jessica Walton and discusses the changes made to Stars in Their Eyes while getting the graphic novel ready for an American audience. Show links Neil Gaimanhttps://www.neilgaiman.com/Society for Children’s Book Writers and Illustratorshttps://www.scbwi.org/ Dave McKean https://www.davemckean.com/ Pictures that Tick. Tadeusz Baranowski is a polish comic maker and some of his comics are on Amazon: Antresolka Profesorka Nerwosolka. About the host Dr Helen Milroy is a descendant of the Palyku people of the Pilbara region of Western Australia. She was born and educated in Perth and has a passionate interest in health and wellbeing, especially for children. She is currently a professor at the University of Western Australia, a consultant child and adolescent psychiatrist, and Commissioner with the National Mental Health Commission. Her books have been shortlisted for the Western Australian Premier’s Book Awards (2019, 2020), the Readings Children’s Book Prize (2020) and the Speech Pathology Australia Book of the Year (2020). And her book, Backyard Birds, won the Whitley Award for the Young Children’s Reader Category (2021). Backyard Beasties, Backyard Bugs, Backyard Birds and Wombat, Mudlark and Other Stories are available in all good bookstores and online. About the guest Aśka is co-creator of the book Stars in their Eyes with Jessica Walton. Aśka is an energetic visual storyteller, illustrator and science communicator who is a passionate advocate for visual literacy. She ...

Listen

April 04, 2022 00:31:40
Brooke Dunnell presents: award-winning novelist Maria Papas challenges the narrative arc in her novel about the effects of childhood illness

Brooke Dunnell presents: award-winning novelist Maria Papas challenges the narrative arc in her novel about the effects of childhood illness

Speaking to Brooke Dunnell on the Fremantle Press podcast, novelist Maria Papas said when she was younger some people told her ‘Writing’s not really a career for a girl from Bunbury … you have to pick something safer’. But, as she points out, her enjoyment of writing has held her in good stead so far. Maria won the 2020 City of Fremantle Hungerford Award for her novel Skimming Stones which follows paediatric nurse Grace as she is confronted by childhood memories of her sister’s illness. Papas’ book Skimming Stones doesn’t follow a typical narrative arc. In this interview, she explains why not. She said, ‘I kept trying to tell the story as a narrative … and I kept on getting stuck … it didn’t feel natural.’ She said she started to research how somebody in trauma or illness did typically tell a story and found that, for the most part, their stories didn’t follow a linear path. Maria said, ‘The person might go back in time to remap what happened or what alternative options could have happened, if only… or they might go to the future to map a more palatable future for the people involved. It’s very difficult to stay in the present moment and very difficult to have a timeline that doesn’t have all those other events that haven’t actually occurred. There is a word for this it’s called the dis-narration.’ Topics discussed: The origins and inspiration behind Skimming StonesWriting illness and traumaDis-narrationPoint of view and representationSubmitting your manuscript for awards Skimming Stones is available in all good bookstores and online. About the host Brooke Dunnell is the author of the short story collection Female(s and) Dogs, which was a finalist ...

Listen

March 11, 2022 00:43:24
How to be an Author: Fremantle Press talks with the Australian Society of Authors CEO and company secretary Olivia Lanchester

How to be an Author: Fremantle Press talks with the Australian Society of Authors CEO and company secretary Olivia Lanchester

Olivia Lanchester, CEO and company secretary of The Australian Society of Authors, joins Claire Miller and Georgia Richter for a chat about the ASA and what writers can gain from being members. Olivia discloses the advocacy work of the ASA being a national body that speaks for authors and talks about the importance of writing groups in connecting established and emerging writers. Editor Rachel Hanson appears as our new Miss Metaphor with the Macquarie Word of the Year for 2021. Topics discussed: The importance of writing groups for authorsServices the ASA offersRecommended rates of pay for authorsWhy writers should be members of the ASATips for new writersThe Macquarie Dictionary 2021 word of the year The How to Be an Author edition of the Fremantle Press podcast is an informal series of chats between publishing industry professionals. Co-hosted by Marketing and Communications Manager Claire Miller and Publisher Georgia Richter, it features regular guest appearances by editors Rachel Hanson, as Miss Metaphor and Kirsty Horton, The Hyphenator and special publishing industry guests and top tips from contributors to the book How to Be an Author: The Business of Being a Writer in Australia. Show Notes Extend your podcast How to Be an Author: The Business of Being a Writer in Australia by Georgia Richter and Deborah Hunn is available in all good bookstores and online. Between its pages you’ll find everything you need to know about the business of being a writer from people who live and breathe books. Connect with Georgia and many of the contributors to the book and podcast in the Facebook group. Guests Olivia Lanchestor is the ASA’s CEO and company secretary. Olivia has worked as a senior intellectual property lawyer in private ...

Listen

16

February 04, 2022 00:29:28
New podcast host Brooke Dunnell teases out the emotional undercurrents of the harvest in her chat with Locust Summer author, David Allan-Petale

New podcast host Brooke Dunnell teases out the emotional undercurrents of the harvest in her chat with Locust Summer author, David Allan-Petale

Our 2021 Fogarty Literary Award winner, Brooke Dunnell, is behind the wheel and driving this year’s Fremantle Press podcast series. In her first episode Brooke visits the Western Australian Wheatbelt to experience the heat and intensity of the harvest through the eyes of her guest, novelist and combine harvester aficionado, David Allan-Petale. His book, Locust Summer, charts the progress of Rowan, a reluctant son and temporary farmhand, bent on rejecting the land he grew up on. David says, ‘Rowan goes from minus ten at the start to zero at the end … so it’s a homecoming story and it’s a redemption story, but [the novel] doesn’t show you that redemption, it shows you the possibility of redemption and the journey that it takes to get to zero.’ David, whose time as a reporter in the Wheatbelt helped shape the book, experienced his own summer harvest when he spent a season on a friend’s farm. He says he was glad he did the harvest because it moved him beyond the simple mechanics of it and clued him into the emotional undercurrents of belonging: ‘The main thing I would say was that doing the harvest gave me an appreciation for how dedicated people are.’ Topics discussed: Advice for unpublished writersDoes being a journalist make you a better novelist?Feeling your way into complex characters; embracing the weirdness of humanityWriting the harvest; exploring work, land, the environment and belonging Locust Summer is available in all good bookstores and online. Show notes About the host Brooke Dunnell is the author of the short story collection Female(s and) Dogs, which was a finalist for the 2020 Carmel Bird Digital Literary Award. Her short stories have been recognised in competitions including ...

Listen

December 02, 2021 00:40:19
How to be an Author: Fremantle Press unpacks the secret of selling books to booksellers

How to be an Author: Fremantle Press unpacks the secret of selling books to booksellers

By his calculations, Penguin Random House account manager Gavin Burbidge attempts to place 432 books into Australian bookstores per month. Across the publishing industry, that means your book will be competing against thousands of titles and your account manager’s pitch could be less than ten seconds long. For a deep dive into sales, Penguin Random House account managers Gavin Burbidge and Jane Parkhill join Claire and Georgia on the How to be an Author podcast. Meanwhile the final Comma Chameleon episode is all about the Macquarie Dictionary’s Word of the Year and Georgia and Claire discuss the relative merits of featuring cats vs dogs, and gerbils vs Hugh Jackman in your author publicity shots. Topics discussed: Competition for shelf spaceHow many titles your book competing withKey promotions times for authorsThe Macquarie Dictionary’s word of the yearTips for authors on how to work with booksellersWhat does a typical sell-in look like? The How to Be an Author editions of the Fremantle Press podcast are an informal series of chats between publishing industry professionals. Co-hosted by Marketing and Communications Manager Claire Miller and Publisher Georgia Richter, it features regular guest appearances by editor Armelle Davies, as the Comma Chameleon, special publishing industry guests and top tips from contributors to the book How to Be an Author: The Business of Being a Writer in Australia. Show Notes Extend your podcast How to Be an Author: The Business of Being a Writer in Australia by Georgia Richter and Deborah Hunn is available in all good bookstores and online. Between its pages you’ll find everything you need to know about the business of being a writer from people who live and breathe books. Connect with Georgia and many ...

Listen
Next